1. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    OK, this at first doesn't look like it's VR/AR related, but keep reading, it's amazing in any way and also VR.

    IN BRIEF
    • A new study has humans playing a computer game based on direct brain stimulation instead of sensory cues from sight, sound, or touch.
    • The subjects had to navigate 21 different mazes and, with stimulation, were able to make the right moves 92 percent of the time.

    SIXTH SENSE


    Can the brain process artificial information and use it to navigate a virtual world without input from any of our five senses? Based on the results of a team of researchers from University of Washington, yes.

    Their work shows humans playing a computer game without relying on sensory cues from sight, sound, or touch. Instead, the gamers navigate through a two-dimensional maze based on direct brain stimulation.

    “The way virtual reality is done these days is through displays, headsets and goggles, but ultimately your brain is what creates your reality,” said Rajesh Rao, UW professor of Computer Science & Engineering and director of the Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering.


    Image Credit: University of Washington

    Tasked to navigate through 21 different mazes, the subjects had to move according to the direction of a phosphene-induced stimulus. Phosphene, which is perceived as light, was generated using transcranial magnetic stimulation—a technique that uses a magnetic coil placed by the skull to stimulate a specific area of the brain directly and in a non-invasive way.

    With stimulation, the test subjects were able to make the right moves in the maze 92 percent of the time, versus just 15 percent without phosphene stimulation.

    “We’re essentially trying to give humans a sixth sense,” adds fellow researcher Darby Losey, a 2016 UW graduate in computer science and neurobiology who now works as a staff researcher for the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS).




    NEW WAY TO EXPERIENCE VIRTUAL REALITY

    Right now, the team is working with external partners to create the company Neubay, a startup focused on commercializing the research and introducing neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into virtual reality and gaming.

    The equipment currently used to stimulate the brain is too bulky to be carried around. Eventually however, they hope to be able to develop hardware that will make it more appropriate for real world applications. They’re also trying to develop techniques that could pave the way for more complex sensory perceptions that are difficult to replicate in augmented or virtual reality.

    It’s a small, but significant, step toward greater applications in entertainment, gaming, and even medicine.

    “Over the long term, this could have profound implications for assisting people with sensory deficits while also paving the way for more realistic virtual reality experiences,” ends Rao.

    Sources:
    - https://www.youtube.com/user/uwneuralsystems/
    - https://futurism.com/new-tech-lets-g...y-their-minds/
    12-08-2016 09:38 PM
  2. pjs37's Avatar
    It will be interesting to see if they can eventually start tapping into our sensory paths to 'trick' us into sensing things we otherwise aren't.
    12-10-2016 09:06 PM
  3. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    It will be interesting to see if they can eventually start tapping into our sensory paths to 'trick' us into sensing things we otherwise aren't.
    Well, take a look at this: http://forums.vrheads.com/vr-news-di...-reality-9320/

    Not exactly what you mean, but it's a start.
    12-13-2016 08:37 PM
  4. pjs37's Avatar
    Well, take a look at this: http://forums.vrheads.com/vr-news-di...-reality-9320/

    Not exactly what you mean, but it's a start.
    It is a start I think we will be hitting a road block if we start trying to duplicate real life in a synthetic manner. You can take locomotion as an example: It is very difficult to make a treadmil that lets you go in any direction lets you jump crouch crawl lay down and do every range of motion you can in real life, that is not to include things like vehiclular movement and all those nuances. It may be technically easier to trick the balance center we have into thinking we are moving when in fact we aren't. Of course when dealing with nerves it is a lot more difficult because we barely grasp what does what and how to fix it let alone direct it the way we want.
    12-14-2016 12:51 PM
  5. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    It is a start I think we will be hitting a road block if we start trying to duplicate real life in a synthetic manner. You can take locomotion as an example: It is very difficult to make a treadmil that lets you go in any direction lets you jump crouch crawl lay down and do every range of motion you can in real life, that is not to include things like vehiclular movement and all those nuances. It may be technically easier to trick the balance center we have into thinking we are moving when in fact we aren't. Of course when dealing with nerves it is a lot more difficult because we barely grasp what does what and how to fix it let alone direct it the way we want.
    I think we are close of that, not in the near future, but I was reading about how some implants are improving by 300% the mobility in paraplegic:

    Experimental implant shows promise for restoring voluntary movement after spinal cord injury | UCLA
    12-14-2016 10:27 PM

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