1. Jared DiPane's Avatar
    I know that if I end up getting one that my 9 year old will want to live inside of it.

    I've yet to put my hands on one, but for those who have: is it child friendly at all? I don't want him to be able to accidentally break it with ease.

    Also, any content that he would like to play that is child-friendly?
    09-28-2016 09:20 AM
  2. Russell Holly's Avatar
    All of Sony's demo stations are currently limiting use to age 13, but there's been no official age limitation in any of the documentation we've seen so far. Like any form of VR, you just have to be careful with how much time is spent in the headset. As for content, there's going to be plenty of kid-friendly games at launch.

    Here's a quick look at some of the titles that will be available - These are the exclusive games for PlayStation VR | VRHeads
    09-28-2016 09:24 AM
  3. krisguy's Avatar
    It's literally a matter of good parenting. My 15 year old can use whatever he wants, but he doesn't. My 11 year old has a ViewMaster Cardboard and he uses it a bit. I'll let him use my Vive once I get comfortable. My daughter won't be touching any VR until she is at least 7.
    09-28-2016 11:00 AM
  4. EgoAnt's Avatar
    I'm a little more liberal with the headgear than that. All of my kids have tried cardboard, and my oldest is 7. I don't let them use it for more than a couple minutes at a time, and not very often.

    They have all had a chance to try the Oculus DK2 as well, again no more than 5 minutes at a time. I'll probably start letting them use things like Tilt Brush and Medium soon.
    09-28-2016 02:07 PM
  5. Russell Holly's Avatar
    I have three little ones, and 20 minute sprints is what I'm comfortable with across all of my hardware. Gives them enough time to enjoy a level or two of whatever we're playing, and they can take turns. I'd say an hour is the upper limit for anyone under 16 for me, but everyone is a little different.
    09-28-2016 04:39 PM
  6. Derek Daisey's Avatar
    I've read a couple different opinions on the matter. Eye doctors say that having a screen too close to your eyes while they're in a developing state (IE a growing child) can hurt your vision to a point where it makes you more near sighted. Some reps have said they don't recommend it for kids because it won't fit on their heads...

    I'd say in small bursts, it might be ok.. It's not much worse than them staring at a smart phone or tablet all day.
    09-28-2016 07:49 PM
  7. Matty's Avatar
    i know this sounds silly but just like there is a drinking age because 'your brain is still developing' and maturity. I would say stick to what Sony has advised. So unless your child is 13 or older. Maybe try get them to go outside and socialise rather. The VR headset is child fiendly in that they cant eat small pieces but not good for their eyes.
    09-29-2016 02:40 AM
  8. Jared DiPane's Avatar
    i know this sounds silly but just like there is a drinking age because 'your brain is still developing' and maturity. I would say stick to what Sony has advised. So unless your child is 13 or older. Maybe try get them to go outside and socialise rather. The VR headset is child fiendly in that they cant eat small pieces but not good for their eyes.
    He spends plenty of time out socializing with others, but also has a love of technology. If I get one and he sees me using it, he will without a doubt want to use it.

    There is no way I would let him live inside of it, but as Russell said I think 20 minutes is an acceptable length of time to play around with it and have some fun (in some age appropriate content).
    09-29-2016 07:35 AM
  9. Russell Holly's Avatar
    The VR headset is child fiendly in that they cant eat small pieces but not good for their eyes.
    Lets not be critical of parenting here. Jared's a good Dad and it was a good question.

    Regarding eye health, remember that Google Cardboard is being used in Elementary School classrooms under specific guidance from pediatricians. We've actually interviewed multiple well ranked pediatricians and found that it's all about moderation. Much in the same way that a child can watch a single 3D movie in a theater without eye harm, as long as the time in the headset is well moderated there's no cause for concern. If your 9 year old crushes an entire Saturday in VR, that's quite different and should be avoided.
    09-29-2016 07:53 AM
  10. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    It's very interesting all the things you all named about the issues about it.

    I was only thinking in the usability of the HMD for the kids, like how to adjust the distance between eyes and stuff like that.

    I once read an article about how autistic kids were treated with games (not VR at that time) to improve some skills they need.
    09-29-2016 08:42 AM
  11. BioFanatic's Avatar
    As someone that is tech-obsessed and also a father, this is a great question. My son is barely 1, so it will be some time until I'll be addressing this, but that time will come. I imagine we'll know more by then. I agree with Jared and Russell, it's all about supervised use and in moderation.

    Funny thought: Growing up, we were always told that we'd go blind from being too close to the TV, haha. I think we'll be in a similar situation with VR.
    Can Sitting Too Close to the TV Damage Your Eyes? - American Academy of Ophthalmology
    09-29-2016 09:22 AM
  12. Cash Machine's Avatar
    I wonder if the 13 and up recommendation is based on hard science, or just a ballpark to rule out potential litigation at some point.
    Chemy JMHT likes this.
    09-29-2016 10:22 AM
  13. Derek Daisey's Avatar
    Probably the latter...
    09-29-2016 01:58 PM
  14. SedahDrol's Avatar
    I think this is one of those things a parent needs to decide for themselves. I give my children unfettered access to all forms of media. Though my wife and I taught them the concept of moderation early. only you know your children. There are a variety of games with different ratings to allow appropriateness. when in doubt play the game yourself then decide. The age limits are pretty much companies covering there butts. its a new technology that until we have suitable long term studies we will have to rely on our individual judgment base on our observations or others annecdotes.

    Like everything in life YMMV. Just remember you are the adult. If you choose to allow your children to use VR i woukd suggest approaching it from a Harm Reduction stance and start with short mild experiences and slowly increase intensity and exposure time. if you notice undesirable side effects in your children dial it back.

    Posted via the VRHeads App for Android
    09-29-2016 06:12 PM
  15. Sim_8_3's Avatar
    I have 4.5 year old but he's a special needs autism spectrum so I will let him use it under strict supervision, I'm not recommending that you let your toddler play with it, but if you have a child who is on the spectrum the could very much benefit from it so long as they don't break it.
    09-30-2016 01:53 AM
  16. Matty's Avatar
    Lets not be critical of parenting here. Jared's a good Dad and it was a good question.

    Regarding eye health, remember that Google Cardboard is being used in Elementary School classrooms under specific guidance from pediatricians. We've actually interviewed multiple well ranked pediatricians and found that it's all about moderation. Much in the same way that a child can watch a single 3D movie in a theater without eye harm, as long as the time in the headset is well moderated there's no cause for concern. If your 9 year old crushes an entire Saturday in VR, that's quite different and should be avoided.
    Let me try clear up what i mean. I wasn't meaning/hinting at all that Jared is a poor parent by any means. I was simply stating that children (while developing centain skills) need to develop them properly while growing and if the child just sits inside all day playing games (not that he would) it may affect them later. Thats all ^_^ Obviously 30 minutes per day is absolutely fine and won't be a problem. Apologies if i came across 'accusatory' in any way Just my opinion and obviously I'm by no means any 'child doctor'
    09-30-2016 02:28 AM
  17. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    I'm still stuck thinking in technical things of the HMD, I don't have kids but you because the amount of brain you all are giving to that I'm pretty sure you are good parents.

    Being honest I think with a little polishing all the ideas given here are good enough to make a deep study about effects of VR on kids.
    09-30-2016 06:23 AM
  18. Derek Daisey's Avatar
    Moderation is key in the beginning... Just like with any electronic device for kids.
    09-30-2016 08:25 AM
  19. Chemy JMHT's Avatar
    Hey I just found an article about it and I Quote:

    "The Oculus Rift and Samsung's Gear VR headsets are recommended for ages 13+, while Sony's recommendation for its PlayStation VR is ages 12 and up. HTC's Vive is not designed for children, according to the company, and HTC said young children shouldn't be allowed to use the headset at all. And Google said its relatively low-tech Cardboard headset should be used by kids only under adult supervision."

    But I think the information in the main article is a little bit better than only what the companies stated about it, here is the link:
    Are Virtual Reality Headsets Safe for Kids?
    10-03-2016 11:39 PM
  20. Cale Hunt's Avatar
    I think my parents would probably just be disappointed in the amount of time I spend in VRI can hear echos of 'turn off that game and go outside'
    10-11-2016 07:20 PM
  21. Russell Holly's Avatar
    I wonder if the 13 and up recommendation is based on hard science, or just a ballpark to rule out potential litigation at some point.
    Mostly the latter, but also eye development slows after 12 in most kids according to the pediatrician I spoke with. Less opportunity for damage over time.
    10-12-2016 05:53 PM
  22. hochoch's Avatar
    We have one at work, my kids, 6&10, came in yesterday and tried it out. My ten year old loved it, had no issues navigating the menus and such. the 6 year old had fun, but had trouble getting around the world and was a little too crazy with it. The issue i see is the cord. As far as i can tell, it's not long enough and not breakaway, sometimes they get carried away. i can see them yanking the whole thing down if not careful. or knocking into other things when not paying attention. also, they get their grease all over the lenses without even trying and i had to keep cleaning it off. i used it myself and it is pretty amazing the few minutes i spent with it.
    10-13-2016 01:10 PM
  23. krisguy's Avatar
    All of us have issues with the cords. I nearly took out my PC playing Vivecraft the other night as the spiders are BIG! I also use spray cleaner for paintball googles on my Vive because the anti-fog component does help with the "greasing" up of the lenses.
    10-13-2016 01:31 PM
  24. Cale Hunt's Avatar
    All of us have issues with the cords. I nearly took out my PC playing Vivecraft the other night as the spiders are BIG! I also use spray cleaner for paintball googles on my Vive because the anti-fog component does help with the "greasing" up of the lenses.
    Heh dungeon crawling in VR is a real rush.
    10-14-2016 12:33 PM

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